Bishops Break Promise Despite Clear Needs of Church

“Bishops Won’t Focus on Abuse Policies” by Laurie Goodstein, The New York Times, June 14, 2011

My take on the info in the above linked article: Are they for real? My daughter graduates from Catholic grade school this week. The Bishops and the Holy See have more than let down her wonderful teachers, the parish priests and fellow classmates. Parents who work hard to raise their children in the Catholic faith deserve so much more.

Their refusal to hold each other accountable will endanger children. Their refusal to be transparent on this issue will push families away from Catholic schools and churches. I am beyond disgusted. A new fire is lit.

Excerpts from NYT article (link above):

“I have never seen the anger as deep and widespread as I have seen and heard and felt it these last three weeks. It’s coming from people that I know of as very conservative, very devout, especially younger people.”

“In both of these dioceses, the bishops never informed their sexual abuse “review boards” about the cases. In his two years in the diocese of Gallup, N.M., Bishop James S. Wall never met with his review board even though the diocese was supposedly conducting a review of abuse cases, a situation first reported by the Gallup Independent newspaper.”

“The question of what to do about bishops who do not follow the charter is not addressed in the revisions. The charter says only that bishops should apply “fraternal correction” to one another.”

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New York Times Article Makes Good Points About John Jay Report

“Church Report Cites Social Tumult in Priest Scandals,” by Laurie Goodstein, The New York Times, May 17, 2011

“In one of the most counterintuitive findings, the report says that fewer than 5 percent of the abusive priests exhibited behavior consistent with pedophilia, which it defines as a “psychiatric disorder that is characterized by recurrent fantasies, urges and behaviors about prepubescent children.

“Thus, it is inaccurate to refer to abusers as ‘pedophile priests,’ ” the report says.

That finding is likely to prove controversial, in part because the report employs a definition of “prepubescent” children as those age 10 and under. Using this cutoff, the report found that only 22 percent of the priests’ victims were prepubescent.

The American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders classifies a prepubescent child as generally age 13 or younger. If the John Jay researchers had used that cutoff, a vast majority of the abusers’ victims would have been considered prepubescent.”